Wednesday, March 21, 2012

Wednesday, March 21, 2012

A delicious dinner of sea bass, seafood pizza, spaghetti, homemade cheesecake, and Spanish Cava at Restaurante Pizzeria-Marie in Costa del Sol! From left to right: Ben Mayo, Laura Ashley Lamm, Carnell Lamm, Deborah Lamm, Catherine Powers-Moseley, Anne Mayo, Freida Wright, and Retha Deaton.

Gibraltar, a small British colony, was the excursion for today! Gibraltar shares Moorish, Spanish, and British influences and is considered the gateway between the Mediterranean Sea and the Atlantic Ocean.  The colony is actually reclaimed land from the sea. Though Gibraltar is an expensive place to live and most people live in Spain and commute to Gibraltar to work, King Fahad from Saudi Arabia actually constructed a White House on the land, which is considered to be a replica of the White House in Washington, DC.
One of the highlights of the colony is the Rock of Gibraltar. The Rock has 150 caves or 30 miles of tunnels inside the rock, built during WWII.  The largest is St. Michael's cave, with a series of underground chambers made up of stalactites and stalagmites.  The Barbary Apes, the most well known novelty, are tailless monkeys native to Morocco.  According to legend, as long as the monkeys remain in Gibraltar, the British will maintain ownership of the Rock;  to insure the legend's continuation, Winston Churchill ordered the preservation of the monkeys when their numbers began to dwindle during WWII.  The monkeys are fed daily at 8 a.m. and 4 p.m. Regular feedings help keep the monkeys from grabbing food, cameras, and pocketbooks--though they will grab them if the opportunity exists.  Tourists are asked not to feed the monkeys or to pet them, as the monkeys walk among the tourists quite freely.
Seeing both Africa and Spain standing on the Rock of Gibraltar reinforces the notion of just how small the world really is.
Deborah Lamm